Volcan de Fuego Fundraiser and Service

We want to express our thanks to all those who contributed to our fundraiser this last June for the victims of the volcano eruption in Guatemala. Two weeks after the volcano erupted we were able to take the money raised down with us and help several families as well as hospitals with your donations. Following is a detailed description of what we used the funds for.

The day we arrived in Guatemala we immediately made contacts in the affected areas with people who were volunteering at the fire department and were placing families who had lost their possessions in different shelters and homes. We assessed several families’ situations of loss and need by visiting with them to determine how we could best be of service.

We met a family of six who were relocated to the house of the local mayor. They had lost everything they had due to the eruption, including the jobs of the grandfather and his son. Later that day, we met with another family of 16 who had five children of elementary school age. None of the children had the required supplies to attend school. They also had a diabetic grandfather who needed medicine. The women of the family had no clothing that fit them. We observed as they cooked lunch for the sixteen members of the family on a one-burner camp stove. The last family we met was a family of 20 members who had 11 children. They had been given an empty house with cots and some blankets. We spoke with some of the women in the family and they told us they were so devastated by losing all their belongings but that they still had family in zone zero. They commented that the children were not used to living in a suburb, they needed to be outside in the fields and that it was hard for them all to stay inside the house. We offered help and their reply was “This isn’t our home, we just want to go back and live where we were.”

During the following two days, the Association organized rides to buy and transport goods from the city to the affected areas. The drive is about two hours and with all the supplies, we needed big, spacious cars with four-wheel drive. We were able to buy the following for these families:

Full grocery lists including: milk, oil, Ensure, water, butter, different meats, vegetables, diapers, toilet paper, etc.

Four lists of school supplies that included over 50 items for each child.

Socks

Underwear for 10 women

Medicine for diabetes, high blood pressure, cough and cold

Vitamins for children and adults

The fourth day in Guatemala we contacted a friend in Antigua who told us about a family of 10 whom he knew through work with the grandfather. Our friend asked us to come and meet them, to hear more about their situation. During our meeting, we found out they had lost their house, jobs, all personal belongings, but all family members had survived. The grandfather and one of his daughters recounted how the eruption materials reached their house and that they were able to flee just in time. One of the girls in the family, a 16 year-old named Ofelia, ran to save her 3 year-old neighbor as they were escaping. However, the hot gases and lava reached them and covered the little girl. Ofelia, had to let go

of the 3 year-old, and she relates, “She got too hot; I couldn’t hold her because I was burning my hand.” Ofelia’s feet and ankles were burned by lava and she was currently under care at the hospital. We immediately made plans to help the whole family with things they needed in the new place were they were living.

We would like to point out that our Association arrived three weeks after the disaster, and that before our arrival, the Guatemalan government had organized shelters for the homeless. Several other organizations were receiving donations of food, clothing, and other basic needs to take to these shelters. The donations given by the Guatemalan people to help their affected brothers and sisters were massive. There were hangars filled to the roof with things for the needy, and truck loads were being taken to the shelters.

When we arrived in Guatemala, shelters had been closed to the public and were being managed by government authorities and the military. The people in the shelters were not receiving the help that had been sent, and in some places they were not allowed to go out of the shelter in which they were stationed. To avoid any type of problem, our Association determined it would be best to reach families outside of the shelters, and outside of zone zero, where we would be allowed to make one-on-one contact.

On day four of our trip, we worked on obtaining a list of household items for Ofelia and her family. These items included blankets, shoes, clothes, some toys, a table and chairs, cooking pans and utensils and pantry items. Edinhart Realty and Design also donated money in cash to the family.

On day five, we were able to make a contact with a medical representative who took us to the public hospital in Escuintla. Here, we talked to the Head of the burned victim’s unit and gave them several boxes of medicine. We were also able to visit with various patients who were being treated for burns, and observed as nurses changed bandages on three young boys. The experience was heartbreaking and shocking. The doctor in charge of the unit at the time related to us how federal regulations made it hard to obtain pain medication, as well as proper treatment for the victims. We left the hospital with a broader view of the situation, as well as a great feeling of duty to do keep helping the victims. We are currently working on finding special beds for drainage and sterile bandage changes for the burned unit. The process is long due to shipping regulations and paperwork to transport special hospital beds into the country.

On our last two days in the country we delivered all the things we had bought for the families each met. We had help from family and friends who let us pack their trucks and vans with all of the supplies. We traveled to Amatitlan and Escuintla early in the morning. We visited with two families in Amatitlan and delivered what we purchased for each of them. We also learned that one of the families we had visited on the first days, had decided to move back closer to ground zero and to keep looking for their missing relatives.

Later that day we made a stop at a meetinghouse of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Escuintla, where they had a shelter set up for 150 people. The church members and other community volunteers had cooked, cleaned and entertained the refugees every day since the disaster. We were able to help by giving activity books to the children, making long lasting name tags for volunteers, and

by delivering cleaning supplies and medications to their pharmacy. It was amazing to see the work of the volunteers that day. 20 women prepared lunch for 200 people and served them all. We also observed their afternoon of exercise and entertainment provided by the State University and the Red Cross. We conversed with the medical personnel and were able to give them some of our donated medicine. We loved being able to share time with other volunteers in the real spirit of giving and aiding those in need.

At the end of the day we travelled close to ground zero to deliver supplies to the last family. Ofelia was so happy when we gave her and her family the things we had purchased for them.

The day was long and productive and we were beyond grateful for all the friends, contacts and family members that offered their time and resources in benefit of the people affected by the volcano eruption.

We know that much is yet to be done and would like to express our sincere thanks to all who donated, friends, family, Edinhart Realty and Design, Melisa Spolini, The Fresno Bee, and all those who continue to support us with your prayers and love as we carry on our service.

check out our feature in the Fresno Bee Newspaper!

https://www.fresnobee.com/news/local/article213297944.html?fbclid=IwAR26zGOetwr0xmsc-fDrRiU_5rfujNW3oakbC71lRmOnOYThvTSQHn391p0

March 2018 Report

We were finally able to review all of our data for the March 2018 health trip to Tzalamtun, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala. Here’s an overview of what happened:

Our mission for this trip was to bring healthcare through physical examinations, consultations, dental work, and administration of medicine. 

As always, none of our work would have been made possible without the help of local teachers and community leaders. All volunteers were transported to the remote village through trucks and gasoline donated by one of the teachers of the local school. Each round trip was about two hours. Other teachers from the elementary school helped to organize the flow of the project, and also found volunteers from the local high school who helped to sterilize and organize materials. Members of IMPRA (Instituto Mixto Privado Ricardo Arjona), another nearby high school, aided as translators of the Q’eqchi language for those of us that cannot speak it, which is most of us! Additional volunteers included Registered Nurses who also served as translators, but also took vitals and helped with patient flow. Finally, and most incredibly of all, the parents of the local students raised funds, which provided a lunch for all volunteers for the three days of the campaign. 

The medical workup included nutrition consults, tests for parasites from stool and urine samples, physical examinations, and consults. Dental workup included examinations, and either extractions and/or fillings for affected teeth. 

And finally, the most telling part of all, EPIDEMIOLOGY. At the current time, all we have been able to count comes from Medical Charts. At the end of the health mission, most of the Dental Records were lost, but efforts are being made to find them. From the medical data, here is what we found.

Patient total : 430 persons

Nutrion-Related diagnoses: 33%

Including: malnutrition, Protein-caloric malnutrition, underweight, diabetes, obesity, overweight, anorexia, avitaminosis, and dehydration.

Parasites: 27.4%

Including: ascaris lumbricoides, uncinaria, trichuris trichuria, entoamoeba coli, strongyloides, endolimax nana, giardia lamblia, retortamonas, chilomastix, mesnilii, tricomonas, and Charcot-Leyden crystals.

GI tract diagnoses: 18.4%

Including: peptic disease, gastritis, gastric ulcers, diarrhea, intestinal amoebas, nausea, irritable colon syndrome, viral gastroenteritis, abdominal pain, and dysentery. 

Infections and other diagnoses: 15.8%

Including: fever, healthy patient, otalgia, viral infection, bacterial infection, cerumen plug, varicella, eye trauma, epistaxis, vision problems, ear infection, common cold, hernia, Chagas, lipoma, lower extremity ulcer, senescence. 

Musculoskeletal diagnoses: 10.7%

Including: myalgia, muscular spasms, prosthetic pain, back pain, muscular tear, athralgia, lower extremity pain, and gynovial cyst.

Urinary Tract Diagnoses: 10.7%

Including: urinary tract infection, and dysuria. 

Neurological diagnoses: 8.8%

Including: cephalea, dizziness, syncope, Bell’s palsy, neuropathy, blurry vision, convulsions, developmental delay, dysgeusia, and weakness. 

Skin-related diagnoses : 6%

Inlcuding: dermatitis, mycosis, sarcoptosis, impetigo, pruritus, vitiligo, and idiopathic infection. 

Respiratory Tract Diagnoses: 4.4%

Including: upper respiratory infection, lower respiratory infection, acute respiratory infection, pneumonia, COPD, left roncus, pharingoamigdalitis, bronchospasm, and bronchitis.

Ob/Gyn Diagnoses: 4.2%

Including: dysmenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, pregnant, cysts, menopause. 

Circulatory and Cardiovascular Diagnoses: 3.2%

Including: anemia, hypertension, tachycardia, heart murmur, aortic aneurysm, varices, and deep vein thrombosis.

 

Although these were just quick facts, we expect to publish a complete scientific report here on our website. Once again, a million thank-you’s to all our volunteers, directly from our family, Professor Edin from Tzalamtum Elementary, parents at the school, students from USAC, and the vice mayor of the town who found us all lodging and dinner for the three nights of the campaign.

We hope that this information brings awareness to the needs of the population, and helps us grow as an organization for better and more specialized care.

To all who donated to make this campaign possible, either with time, or monetarily in the United States, WE LOVE YOU AND THANK YOU!

Miguel Vargas Team

our dental clinic where 12 dentists did extractions and fillings

our dental clinic where 12 dentists did extractions and fillings

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some of the high school students ran the sterilization station   

some of the high school students ran the sterilization station

 

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the triage area as patients came in we were able to take vitals and coordinate patient flow to the different areas with the help of these nursing students.

the triage area as patients came in we were able to take vitals and coordinate patient flow to the different areas with the help of these nursing students.

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more than 800+ people were able to come in and receive health care   

more than 800+ people were able to come in and receive health care

 

this time, with the help of students and professionals from USAC, we provided nutrition consults, full lab work for patients, medical consults, as well as medicine.

this time, with the help of students and professionals from USAC, we provided nutrition consults, full lab work for patients, medical consults, as well as medicine.

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patients were weighed and measured and given nutritional advice as to their daily habits and food intake.

patients were weighed and measured and given nutritional advice as to their daily habits and food intake.

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young girl waits to be seen by a doctor with her little brother

young girl waits to be seen by a doctor with her little brother

kids waiting outside the dental clinics for their parents with one of our board members, ileana.

kids waiting outside the dental clinics for their parents with one of our board members, ileana.

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some of the students' parents who helped organize the patients

some of the students' parents who helped organize the patients

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we were able to have a full pharmacy because of the donations received. these pharmacists who volunteered their time and skills, kept an inventory and gave prescriptions to the patients, free of cost.

we were able to have a full pharmacy because of the donations received. these pharmacists who volunteered their time and skills, kept an inventory and gave prescriptions to the patients, free of cost.

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in the school's kitchen, students' parents worked all morning cooking for 60+ people. they gathered funds among them and gave us lunch for three days. it was their way to say thank you. 

in the school's kitchen, students' parents worked all morning cooking for 60+ people. they gathered funds among them and gave us lunch for three days. it was their way to say thank you. 

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Upcoming plan for March 2018 Mission

This march we will once again bring medical and dental help to a village in Cahabon, Alta Verapaz, called Tzalamtun. We have not visited this location before. The village is located 6 km north of Santa Maria Cahabon. There are 348 households, 485 families with a total population of 2,400. Due to the distance from the nearest city, most inhabitants haven’t seen a dentist or received medical treatment in their lives. The elementary school has offered us the building to set up dental and medical clinics. With the help of students and dentists we will perform extractions, amalgam and resin fillings, fluoride applications and dental sealants. Furthermore, with the help of the students and faculty from the college of pharmacy and chemistry from the University of San Carlos de Guatemala we will be able to give the patients lab work including: blood, urine, and stool samples. This will help the doctors have a better understanding in order to give accurate diagnosis and treatment. In addition, this time students from the University’s college of nutrition will help evaluate children and mothers’ nutritional needs.

The funds raised will help us provide medicine, vitamins, antiparasitics, materials, and equipment. The lab work needs chemical reagents which give accurate results and we need to bring them as well. In past projects, we have come across the problem of power outage and it has hindered our ability to provide more help. This time we need to bring portable generators. Funds will additionally cover 60 desks which we will provide for the elementary school “El Rosario.” The school has no means by which to provide a desk to each student, so some children sit on the floor or stand while in class. 

Like we stated in the August 2017 report, we are bringing a water tank system to provide clean filtered water to the village of Villa Nueva Sexan. We need to buy the tank and the pipe system as well as a cement foundation that will hold it. The parents and school children often find themselves walking miles to carry drinking water to their homes in arduous terrain.

In the area of education, last November we started a project with the help of our friend Craig Cleveland and associates from Fresno State University in which we translated two children’s books to the Mayan Dialect of Q’eqchi. Jose Coronado, a member of our board, aided in the translation of the books which were delivered to the children of the Villa Nueva Sexan elementary school. Our goal is to develop a reading habit in the children and their families and create a need for the children to remain in school. With our purpose in mind, the children were provided with solar powered light bulbs. This will allow them to read in their homes at night or when power goes out. This year we would like to further the project, by translating more books and bringing them to the children, as well as using the help of the students from the graduating class of elementary teachers to oversee the project.

We greatly appreciate your donations to bring the much needed help to the children and their families.

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Elementary School in Tzalamtun, Cahabon.

Elementary School in Tzalamtun, Cahabon.

elementary school where the association's health clinics will be set up this march 2018.

elementary school where the association's health clinics will be set up this march 2018.

village of Tzalamtun, Cahabon, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala. 

village of Tzalamtun, Cahabon, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala. 

August 2017 Expedition

We planned several different projects to be a part of the whole expedition. The two main activities consisted of providing medical and dental services to the people of Santa Maria Cahabon. We were able to see more than 600 medical patients and 300 dental patients. It was a huge blessing to count with the support from all the monetary donations that helped cover materials, medicine, school supplies and more. We write this to express our thanks to the many contributors of monetary means, time, volunteers and family who made this service to our brothers in Guatemala possible. Following is an account of the events that took place during the three days the association spent in the town. 

With help from the Mayor, we were able to use the second floor of the main hospital building. Here we placed 6 dental chairs and 6 medical clinics. We had an area for physical therapy and one for pharmacy. We rejoice in the fact that many who came left with treatment and medicine. At the same time there was a group of American Volunteers who attended and assisted in the educational part of the project. The volunteers visited three elementary schools in the outskirts of the town where they provided the students with school supplies that consisted of pencil pouches with tooth paste, tooth brush, dental floss, crayons and colored pencils, pens, pencils, erasers, sharpeners, glue sticks and food like brownies, cereal and a drinks. Hygiene kits were also given to the children. There were also three high schools that were visited by the same volunteers where motivational and career orientation conferences were given. The students that were in the lasts years of high school received dry erase markers and hygiene kits. Thank you to the Clevelands, The Cox, The Nemelkas, and Mr. Emet Perez, who were present, bringing contributions. Thank you to the local teachers and principals of the schools. Thank you to those who gave money, time, efforts, supplies and mainly love and compassion for each of the children in these schools. Thank you to our guest speakers, Cesar Antonio and Tony De Leon, for their preparation and enthusiasm with which they delivered their presentations.

At one particular elementary school called, Villanueva Sexan, volunteers worked on building a cement foundation for the school. We had seen the need that the children of this school were in, having only a dirt floor, no desks, and lacking proper structure of the school building. Which impacted the children's health and attendance.  The association donated desks and the new floor, which prompted the town authorities to provide a roof; as the parents collected funds to build the walls. This last December, the school was completed. Take a look at the photos below where you can see the before and after results.  In this same little town, as the project was taking place, one of the women, mother of several children, approached our group and raised her voice to request water for the village.  She suggested one big container for all.  The volunteers were so moved with her request, that this coming march, one of our main activities will be bringing donations for a water tank to be installed in the village. 

One more  highlight of this trip was the physical therapy unit that was coordinated Mrs. Nan Reid, PT and her assistant Mr. Bruce Cox from Bountiful, Utah.  Two of our local coordinators, Kevin, and Flory went with them to Home-bound patients, hospital consultations and seniors to provide treatment, medicine and printed exercises guides to continue treatment. This was a huge blessing to many. All the patients treated were not even aware of the need they had for physical therapy. The association really started to understand the dire need that many of the citizens, living in this area, have for specialist-directed physical therapy. We cannot find words to describe the relief that Nan and Bruce brought to the community in those three days of hard labor. We witnessed the efficacy and relief that therapy can provide in these remote areas where the word physical therapy does not even exist.

As it has been part of our expeditions, we provided a lunch, with joint efforts of Group San Egidio, for 80 senior citizens. The seniors come together to receive one meal a week thanks to the work and service of group San Egidio. Every time we visit, we are able to provide an extra meal that week for them. This visit we were able to put together some physical therapy exercises for the attendees. The seniors all joyously participated. 

This expedition was a success again. In great part to the many people who contributed. The Association Miguel Vargas would like to thank the following:

  • Our wonderful friends from Las Vegas, under the fundraising direction of Brenelly Arredondo.  
  • Our always supportive friends from Fresno and Clovis, California.
  • Friends in Santa Maria Cahabon who have organized the day to day flow and provide the contacts that give the association countless reasons to come back. Our Expedition director this year, Profesor Edgar Ixim, Assistant Directors Kevin Quiroa and Profesor Hans Gonzales, Vidal Chiquin.
  • Our amazing family in Santa Maria Cahabon, who provide housing, meals and love to us and our friends who visit.
  • The many students from Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala from the colleges of Medicine and Dentistry under the direction of our  Medical Director in Guatemala, Dr. Jefferson Silvestre, MD 
  • Our friends and dear family in Guatemala who give of their time and resources, from buses to water bottles, and continue to support the association's endeavors every year. 

 

Special thanks to:

Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala

Operacion Bendicion, Guatemala

Municipalidad de Santa Maria Cahabon, Sr. Darwin Lucas

Henry Schein, USA

Ultradent USA

Perez Distributing

Grupo San Egidio

Hugo Coronado DDS, Inc.

Transportes R. Junior Hermanos S.A.

Hogar Materno Ana Sayre

Instituto por Cooperativa de Educacion Basica

CEPREC

Instituto Mixto Privado "Ricardo Arjona"

 

Our Eternal gratitude to:

David Brown, Lisa Cole, Stephanie J., Emily Hemmert, Alba Lopez, Kris Smith, Rachel Kim, Jodie Lombart, Angelica Ramirez, Kelly Arcia, Thalia Ulibarri, Raisa Rock, Enoc Flores, Darje Martin, Michael Dillon, Kyle and McKenzie Noel, Breann Montesanto, Alondra Castillo, Joseph Selmser, Devona Jordan, Ammy Encinas, Bud Willson, Amy Gomez, Tiffany and Rick Madsen, Haley McCauley, Tracy Carlson, Lisa and Mike Roubicek, Malan Cousins, Allison Kellogg, Angela Williams, Craig, Marianne, Maddie, Ana, and Camille Cleveland, Nan Reid, Jessica and JR Nemelka, Shirley, Bruce, Sadie and Sydney Cox, Cesar Antonio y Tony De Leon, Esperanza Ortiz de, Edgar and Luz Maria Ixim, Kevin Quiroa, Hans and Mayra Gonzalez, Flory Pop, Vidal Chiquin, Emeterio Perez, Esperanza Ortiz de Rodriguez, Cesar y Telma Gonzalez, Gloria Vargas Garcia, Edwin Canahui Robinson, Ligia Sierra, Sra. Mechela Garcia, Alfonso Argueta y Familia, Faibel Ixim, Brenelly and Victor Arredondo, Salvador and Ninnette Guerra, Sito and Magleny Coronado, Jorge and Mayra Flores, Julie Call, Preston Anderson, Dr. Francisco Ceballos, Dra.Cermeno,and Dra. Maria Fernanda Soto. 

 

We leave you with some of the best memories we made as we served the people of Cahabon! Service really does bring joy to the soul!

 

Taking off to the first elementary school visit. 

Taking off to the first elementary school visit. 

packing the supplies donated to take to Cahabon.

packing the supplies donated to take to Cahabon.

planning the flow of the day.

planning the flow of the day.

packing the truck with the supplies and materials to take. 

packing the truck with the supplies and materials to take. 

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Although we arrived in Cahabon at 11 pm, we still needed to put the school supplies for the children together in the pouches. 

Although we arrived in Cahabon at 11 pm, we still needed to put the school supplies for the children together in the pouches. 

the dental supplies that were donated for the patients and children. 

the dental supplies that were donated for the patients and children. 

These are the desks that were donated for the school below.

These are the desks that were donated for the school below.

volunteers carried the desks up the mountain and across a river to bring them to the school.

volunteers carried the desks up the mountain and across a river to bring them to the school.

Most of the desks were used, others were just the metal frame, but they were all fixed, as you will see in the pictures below.

Most of the desks were used, others were just the metal frame, but they were all fixed, as you will see in the pictures below.

The volunteers along with members of the village hard at work, to build the school's foundation. 

The volunteers along with members of the village hard at work, to build the school's foundation. 

Even some of the students wanted to join in the cement mixing.

Even some of the students wanted to join in the cement mixing.

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As they prepared the cement, the children were given their school supplies.

As they prepared the cement, the children were given their school supplies.

Our volunteers in front of the old school house with a group of mothers from the village. 

Our volunteers in front of the old school house with a group of mothers from the village. 

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Here is the finished school house four months later. The children now all have beautiful desks, a cement floor, walls and a roof to guard them from the heavy rainfall.   

Here is the finished school house four months later. The children now all have beautiful desks, a cement floor, walls and a roof to guard them from the heavy rainfall.

 

This is what the school house looks like outside. 

This is what the school house looks like outside. 

Here the volunteers are visiting another elementary school.

Here the volunteers are visiting another elementary school.

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Delivering more school supplies

Delivering more school supplies

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The Medical and Dental part of the Project was taking place at the same time. 

The Medical and Dental part of the Project was taking place at the same time. 

Extractions as well as amalgalm restaurations were performed by the dentists. 

Extractions as well as amalgalm restaurations were performed by the dentists. 

Dr. Coronado and the rest of the dental team were able to treat over 350 patients. 

Dr. Coronado and the rest of the dental team were able to treat over 350 patients. 

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Many dental students from the state university volunteer with the association on an anual basis. They give of their time and knowledge to come aid their guatemalan brothers and sisters in need. 

Many dental students from the state university volunteer with the association on an anual basis. They give of their time and knowledge to come aid their guatemalan brothers and sisters in need. 

all treated patients were given toothpaste, toothbrushes, dental floss and shampoo. 

all treated patients were given toothpaste, toothbrushes, dental floss and shampoo. 

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The sterilizing station where instruments are being scrubbed with germicide and other chemicals.

The sterilizing station where instruments are being scrubbed with germicide and other chemicals.

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The patients were able to see a list of monetary donors and some wanted to specifically pick a name and let them know they were so thankful. 

The patients were able to see a list of monetary donors and some wanted to specifically pick a name and let them know they were so thankful. 

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Dr. Coronado with Jessica Alvarez (left) a dental student, and Dr. Alejandra Cermeno (right).

Dr. Coronado with Jessica Alvarez (left) a dental student, and Dr. Alejandra Cermeno (right).

Our friend Nan Reid PT, giving instruction to patients for physical therapy exercises in their home. 

Our friend Nan Reid PT, giving instruction to patients for physical therapy exercises in their home. 

Ileana, Mr. Cox and Mrs. Reid on a tuk tuk ride as they went from home to home providing physical therapy advice and instruction to various people in need. 

Ileana, Mr. Cox and Mrs. Reid on a tuk tuk ride as they went from home to home providing physical therapy advice and instruction to various people in need. 

helping a patient with some exercises to help in easing pain in her lower back.

helping a patient with some exercises to help in easing pain in her lower back.

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The volunteers visiting and providing an extra meal a week for 80 seniors with the help of group San Egidio. The physical therapist provided exercises for them to keep their bodies fit and moving. 

The volunteers visiting and providing an extra meal a week for 80 seniors with the help of group San Egidio. The physical therapist provided exercises for them to keep their bodies fit and moving. 

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Some of our family and friends helping serve the meal to the seniors. 

Some of our family and friends helping serve the meal to the seniors. 

The People of the town were so thankful. 

The People of the town were so thankful. 

Many of them wanted to express how thankful they were with our friends. 

Many of them wanted to express how thankful they were with our friends. 

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Ileana giving out bracelets that our friends from Fresno, California.

Ileana giving out bracelets that our friends from Fresno, California.

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One couple, Cesar and Toni de Leon, gave the high school students motivational talks. 

One couple, Cesar and Toni de Leon, gave the high school students motivational talks. 

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Our friends, Maddie, Camille, Anna, Jessica, Saddie and Sydney, gave the high school girls, motivation to stay in school and graduate.

Our friends, Maddie, Camille, Anna, Jessica, Saddie and Sydney, gave the high school girls, motivation to stay in school and graduate.

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the girls were given hygiene kits and some nail polish.

the girls were given hygiene kits and some nail polish.

Jessi with two of the teachers from institute IMPRA.

Jessi with two of the teachers from institute IMPRA.

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Special thanks to these dedicated students from the University of San Carlos Medicine and Dental colleges.

Special thanks to these dedicated students from the University of San Carlos Medicine and Dental colleges.

Visiting Peten after the service project with our volunteers from USA. 

Visiting Peten after the service project with our volunteers from USA.